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7126 Hollister Ave Goleta, CA 93117
805-685-4513
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Minimally Invasive Orthopedic & Soft Tissue Surgery

The benefits of minimally invasive surgery to your pet are the same as they are for you, less postoperative pain and quicker recovery with fewer expected complications. In many cases performing a procedure endoscopically allows for it to be done as an outpatient procedure, a less painful and traumatic alternative for both patient and owner. Additionally, visualization afforded by these techniques and equipment make for a precise means of assessment of the disease state as well as help us more precisely treat the diseased tissue with minimal damage to the surrounding, otherwise healthy, tissues.

Dr. Dalo has formal advanced training and experience in arthroscopic, laproscopic and thoracoscopic surgery. This technology and experience is normally found only in university veterinary teaching hospitals or in the best specialty veterinary hospitals. LCAH has all the necessary arthroscopic, laproscopic and thoracoscopic equipment on site and a knowledgeable staff to perform most arthroscopic, laproscopic and thoracoscopic procedures. Most of our equipment is Storz Surgical Instruments - the same equipment used in leading human hospitals.

As with all minimally invasive scope assisted surgery, due to lack of sufficient pre-operative information on your pet's specific surgical problem,there are instances while using the scopes we may learn that your pet's problem cannot be effectively treated by using the minimally invasive surgical approach alone. In these cases, it is important that your pet be at a hospital where the endoscopist doctor is very experienced and knowledgeable to quickly convert to an open, more traditional, surgical incision approach. At LCAH we are extremely experienced and formally trained in all orthopedic, thoracic, abdominal and maxillofacial traditional open surgical conversions. If we were not we should not be trying to do minimally invasive surgery on you pet in the first place.

EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE ON-SITE

And examples of diseases treated on a regular basis at LCAH by use of scopes and minimally invasive surgery:

Laproscope - Endoscopy of the abdominal cavity commonly used as a diagnostic tool for taking biopsies of the liver, kidneys and pancreas. It is also used at LCAH to perform spay, retained abdominal testicle, adrenalectomy and gastropexy.

  • Biopsies of: Liver, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal glands, prostate and most abdominal organs.
  • Removal of abdominal testicles, ovaries, adrenal gland
  • Laproscopic assisted: Gastropexy intestinal foreign body removal and removal of a diseased part of intestine, bladder stone removal
  • Laproscopic exploratory of the entire abdominal cavity

Cystoscope - Endoscopy of the urinary bladder, used in patients presenting with chronic infections, blood in the urine, straining to urinate, incontinence, trauma, stones and abnormal radiographs.

  • Obtain biopsies of bladder wall or growths on the bladder wall
  • Stone removal
  • Evaluate for ectopic ureters
  • Examination of the lining of the bladder

Arthroscope - Endoscopy of the joint, used in cases of chronic lameness, joint pain, joint instability, swelling and abnormal radiographic findings. Used for joint examinations and to take accurate joint capsule biopsies.

  • Knee: Used to confirm cruciate ligament and meniscal diseases.
    Surgical example: Removal of torn meniscal tissue and cruciate ligament tissue, OCD lesion removal, help fix knee joint fractures
  • Elbow: Used to confirm coronoid disease, OCD (Osteochondrosis Dessicans,) ununited anconeal process.
    Surgical example: Fragmented coronoid process removal and abrasion arthroplasty, help fix elbow fractures
  • Shoulder: Used to confirm bicipital tendon partial tears and tendonitis, OCD lesions.
    Surgical example: Bicipital tendon release and humeral condyle OCD lesion debridement
  • Hips: Used to evaluate the cartilage health in the hips prior to doing TPO (Triple Pelvic Osteotomy) for hip dysplasia.
  • Hock: Used to evaluate for OCD lesions.
    Surgical example: OCD lesion debridement

Rhinoscope - Endoscopy of the nasal cavity. Commonly used in dogs and cats presenting with nasal discharge, nasal obstruction, chronic sneezing, nasal bleeding, facial distortion, nasal pain and abnormal radiographs.

  • Evaluate the entire nose for lumps and foreign bodies such as fox tails.
  • Obtain biopsies before nasal surgery to create a proper surgical approach.
  • Obtain nasal secretions to help make a correct diagnosis.
  • Remove polyps in some cases.

Video Otoscope - Endoscopy of the external and middle ear allowing for safe and thorough ear cleaning under constant visualization, removal of foreign objects, polyp removal and diagnostic sampling.

  • Evaluate the entire external ear canal and take samples and remove foreign material.
  • Evaluate the middle ear for lumps, foreign material etc. and in some cases removal of foreign material and lumps.

Thoracoscope - Endoscopy of the thoracic cavity. Commonly used to help take diagnostic tissue samples and perform some surgical procedures within the chest cavity with minimal pain to your pet. Surgeries such as partial lung lobe removal and partial pericardial sack removal can easily be performed by use of these minimally invasive tools.

  • Removal of part of the pericardial sack to treat cardiac tamponade.
  • Removal of part of a diseased lung lobe, e.g. lung cancer for example.
  • Obtain biopsies of masses within the chest cavity.

Bronchoscope - Endoscopy of the larynx, trachea and lower bronchi. Commonly used to help take diagnostic fluid samples and remove foreign material from the airways.

  • Evaluate the trachea and larynx.
  • Obtain fluid samples from the lungs to aid in making a diagnosis.
  • Remove foreign material from the airway.
  • Used to assist in larynx and tracheal surgeries.

Gastroscope and Colonoscope - Endoscopy of the upper and lower intestinal tract.

  • Removal of foreign objects from the esophagus, stomach and upper small intestine.
  • Obtain biopsies and fluids from the intestinal tract to help make a diagnosis.

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